Archive for Government

Tunesia launches nationwide e-procurement system

February 5, 2013  |  Africa, Government, Purchase-to-pay

The Tunisian e-procurement system (TUNEPS) was launched in January 2013. TUNEPS is important as public procurement represents some 15% of the Tunesian GDP. According to the Secretary of State for Finance the e-procurement system will give further efficiency and transparency to the public procurements.

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Ecuador starts with mandatory e-invoicing as from 2014

In 2012 the Ecuadorian government performed an e-invoicing pilot with 20 companies. To make the public familiar with the mandatory e-invoicing procedure this year (2013) the tax office provides training from February to June through virtual classrooms and on site in regional tax offices. This is how the Ecuadorian mandatory e-invoicing systems works....

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Belgium adopts e-PRIOR for e-Invoicing. Smart. Very smart.

The Belgian Federal Government decided to reuse e-PRIOR for e-Invoicing in the future, it's a system that's already used by the European Commission. Aren’t these Belgians clever? We know, we know, you’d rather build your only little infrastructure for a couple million euro.

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6 e-billing and AP automation news bytes

Kofax announces Kofax MarkView for Accounts Payable 8.0, Billtrust of Hamilton acquires Best Practice Systems, Belgian federal government launches website to encourage e-invoicing, InvoiceASAP and Hybrid Paytech partner up for e-invoicing services. And we love this one: T-Mobile Poland awards prizes in e-invoice competition.

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Azerbaijani Ministry of Taxes switches to e-invoice

December 18, 2012  |  Adoption, Asia, Electronic Invoicing, Government

An interesting fact about Azerbaijan: its Ministry of Taxes is preparing the country for the use of e-invoices. The Azerbaijan Press Agency (APA) reports that the ministry has already prepared a relevant draft decision on the form, application, and use of accounting rules of the e-invoice.

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GXS’s Active Invoices is tax-compliant in Mexico and Brazil

GXS announced that it has expanded e-invoicing compliance for its Active Invoices with Compliance (AIC) to Mexico and Brazil. The Software as a Service (SaaS) solution’s global tax compliance footprint now includes 41 countries across 5 continents. And e-invoicing within some of these countries happens to be subject to strict rules and standards.

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Give the EC your view on e-invoicing in public procurement!

Some of the EU member states have made e-invoicing mandatory for business-to-government (B2G) transactions, which has led to several separate national e-invoicing systems. The result: fragmentation of the internal market. The EC is trying to figure how to overcome the barriers of e-invoicing in public procurement. You’ve guessed it: a consultation.

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Portugal complies with Council Directive 2010/45/EU

October 16, 2012  |  Electronic Invoicing, Europe, Government, Legal

Council Directive 2010/45/EU says that “Member States shall adopt and publish, by 31 December 2012 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive.” Portugal is one of these 27 member states and properly plays by the rules, because its government has published VAT legislative changes.

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Bruges first to embark on e-invoicing project

October 9, 2012  |  Electronic Invoicing, Europe, Government

It’s for good reason that the medieval centre of Bruges is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The largest city in the Belgian province of West Flanders doesn’t hang around in the Middle Ages when it comes to e-invoicing, because Bruges kicks off a major project to start off local authorities with e-invoicing in a simple and fast way.

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EU doesn’t keep up with e-invoicing pace

Susie West’s sharedserviceslink.com wants to keep its community for leaders in finance shared services open to different opinions. During their e-Invoicing Europe conference last July the European Commission’s influence on the e-invoicing market was brought up for discussion. The conclusions don’t look too rosy.

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